Behavioral Coaching

During a behavior change coaching session, a client-coach relationship is first established and a coaching program is structured from a strengths-based perspective. It is a predictable, though nonlinear, cycle of change that clients experience. Coaching through all stages beginning with awareness, demands the utilization and communication techniques that help people better understand and explore present states and future visions. Once the stage of change is identified, I employ techniques to help continue progress and help clients and patients recognize whether and how a change should occur. A lot of the work also involves a cognitive behavioral approach where client’s identify strengths and barriers and the coach guides clients to creating attainable goals. It’s also important for the coach to maintain effective accountability techniques and have the ability to appropriately respond to reluctance.

Some examples of behaviors that need to be addressed include:

  • For Adolescents in Particular: Too many hours dedicated to video games.
  • Procrastination
  • Unhealthy Self-Care: A sedentary lifestyle, eating/drinking habits, tobacco, etc.
  • Problems in the workplace that negatively affect work productivity and colleague relationships
  • Recurring problems in social and intimate relationships ie. Blaming others, manipulating others, not setting boundaries etc.

Ryan Long, MSW, LICSW

ryan@ryanlonglicsw.com

202-875-1495

verified by Psychology Today

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